One of the recurring themes of the Torah is the importance of seeing the Divine in everyday events. This week, the Torah teaches us about the splitting of the sea for the Jewish people. In the same Torah portion, the Torah discusses a person's sustenance (Exodus, 16:35) and health (ibid, 15:26).

We tend to take so many things in life for granted, so the Torah places these topics in the same portion to teach us that if we look hard enough at the common occurrences in our lives, we will see the Divine in them. The most mundane event can become the equivalent to the splitting of the sea.

In fact, King David teaches us that by looking into ourselves, we can see the hand of God. The Rabbis were sensitive to this and instituted a blessing that we say every time we use the bathroom: "Blessed are You, the Eternal, Who heals all flesh and does wondrous acts." What this blessing is stating is that the Almighty created what no human can: a pump that can work for 120 years without a break, a filter that never needs replacing, and a computer that orchestrates billions of cells in our body and rarely crashes.

If we see the Divine in these seemingly mundane things, we will realize that there is really nothing mundane in the world and every day will become as wondrous as the day the sea split. Interestingly, the morning prayer includes the section of the splitting of the sea so that we can wake up and start our day with a sense of awe and gratitude.